Tag Archive: Hungarian


Cabbage Rolls

Savoy Cabbage | At Down Under | Viviane Perenyi

Commonly found in winter time, dressed in deep purple or nice shades of green with beautiful textured leaves, here’s the cabbage.

From my childhood, I remember cabbage slowly cooked in my mother’s potée de chou or finely sliced in her spicy achard de légumes.
But for today it’s a Hungarian inspired dish I share with you.

Hungarian Cabbage Rolls | At Down Under | Viviane Perenyi

Half way between a töltött káposzta -stuffed cabbage- and a pörkölt these cabbage rolls are a personal interpretation.
I used fresh savoy cabbage leaves instead of the traditional pickled ones and simmered the filled rolls in an onion rich and paprika flavored sauce.
These little parcels are perfect comfort food on a chilly winter night.

Hungarian Cabbage Rolls | At Down Under | Viviane Perenyi

Cabbage Rolls
Makes 6

385g pork mince
100g cooked rice
6 cabbage leaves
salt, pepper
Good pinch of paprika powder
Fresh thyme and rosemary finely chopped
1 garlic clove, mashed

1 big onion, finely chopped
1 heaped tsp good quality paprika powder
250ml stock
Olive oil

In a large bowl mix together mince meat, rice, garlic, chopped herbs, paprika and season liberally with salt and pepper.
With a sharp knife cut horizontally to thin the thick part of the central vein of each cabbage leaf. In a large saucepan filled with boiling water, blanch one by one cabbage leaf for a minute or two and drain well. Fill each leaf with two teaspoons of meat mince, placing the filing on the base of the leaf where the vein is large. Roll the leaf on itself and fold the sides towards the centre before closing the roll.
In a large saucepan, under slow-medium heat, pour olive oil to cover generously all the bottom of the pan (half cm of oil). Slowly cook onion, stirring from time to time, until the onion is soft. This may take up to 10 minutes. You want to release the juice from the onion and get them very soft. Remove the pan from the heat and add paprika and stir. Place cabbage rolls in the pan. Make sure each roll sits with the opening part facing down, touching the bottom of the pan to secure each roll while cooking. Pour the stock, season with salt and pepper, gently stir and cover. Simmer under slow-medium heat for about an hour, until the sauce has thicken. Adjust seasoning and serve hot.

Cabbage | At Down Under | Viviane Perenyi

LA SUITE EN FRANÇAIS…

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Reach for the Moon

 © 2011 Viviane Perenyi Hungarian Almond Kifli Cookies

The end of the year is fast approaching and everyone seems to anticipate the festive time ahead.
I’ve already seen shops displayed their glittery decoration. And I’m completely astound how this year has gone so fast…

I can’t really say that I’m on a Christmas mode yet. I’m fine for now enjoying Spring. In the plate. And outside. Or maybe because I’m more last minute and improvisation than planning ahead.

So I was the first surprised when I uploaded the picture above and thought to myself: this really looks christmas-y

 © 2011 Viviane Perenyi Asparagus and Buckwheat Lunch

Well, Paprika has been waiting for a while that I bake these vaníliás kifli. The Hungarian name comes from the crescent shape -kifli- and the vanilla flavour -vaníliás.

Researching afterwards about these cookies, I found out they were traditionally baked at Christmas time (once again !) but now enjoy all year round. The eggless dough is commonly made with walnut meal, but almond works just fine too.
Heavily sprinkled with icing sugar they look like little moon.

They were gone in a blink of an eye…

© 2011 Viviane Perenyi Hungarian Almond Kifli Cookies

The recipe has been given to me by the teacher of my Hungarian course. The slight changes I’ve made are between brackets.

Vaníliás Kifli – Hungarian Walnut Biscuit
Makes about 70

250gr or 2 cups flour (210gr)
200gr or 2/3 cup + 1/4 cup unsalted butter, soften (+ if you make it with almond meal)
80gr or 2/3 cup icing sugar
60gr or 1/3 cup ground walnut (100gr ground almond)
5-6 drops vanilla essence (Good pinch of vanilla powder)
Icing sugar for dusting

In a bowl mix with your hand all the ingredients to form smooth paste. Let it rest covered in a cool place (not the fridge) for 30 minutes.
Butter two baking trays -or line them with baking paper. Preheat oven to 180°C/356°F. Cut the dough in 4 equal parts and roll to shape it like a log of 2cm/1 inch diameter. Cut the log every 5cm/2 inches and shape each piece like a crescent. Bake for 8-10 minutes or until lightly golden. Remove from oven and sprinkle with icing sugar.

 © 2011 Viviane Perenyi Milk and Hungarian Kifli Cookies

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This is also my entry to Sweet NZ hosted this month by Mairi at Toast.

Round up here

La suite en français…

Dotted

© 2011 Viviane Perenyi Turo Rudi

Paprika introduced me to Túró Rudi in one of my first trips to Hungary.
Useless to say that I liked it from the first bite. Whenever we were in a supermarket, I grabbed a couple of them.

It’s a very popular sweet made of quark (túró in Hungarian) coated with chocolate and shape like a stick. The taste is distinctive -to other chocolate bars- and so is the red polka dot packaging.

© 2011 Viviane Perenyi Turo Rudi Diptych

It was last week, after hosting a Hungarian dinner at home, I had quark left and thought of trying to make some.
The first batch was enough convincing. The most important is to find the right quark, as the creamy kind will not work here. After that, it’s fairly easy to do. And very quick to eat !

© 2011 Viviane Perenyi Turo Rudi

Túró Rudi (makes about 12)

350gr quark
2 heaped tbsp icing sugar
1 good pinch of vanilla powder
180gr dark chocolate for coating (there’ll be chocolate left)

Drain well quark by gently squeezing the water out through a muslin cloth.
In a bowl mix well together quark, sugar and vanilla. With a teaspoon, scoop the mixture and roll into a small ball between your palms. Line a baking tray with parchment paper.
Melt chocolate in a double boiler. Dip one by one quark ball with the help of a toothpick and gently shake off the chocolate excess. Let them cool completely on baking paper. Keep refrigerated if not consumed directly.

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