Tag Archive: bun


Ngahuru

Sinemage Autumn fruits apples grapes and walnuts

Ngahuru, kura kai, kura tangata” means ‘harvest-time, wealth of food, the wealth of people’ in Maori.
I’m always keen on knowing local expression, so thank you Mike for adding this phrase to the invitation of the potluck dinner organized a couple of weeks ago with the theme ‘Autumn’.

Useless to say I liked the idea. This season is not only beautiful, with warm shades outside, but offers indeed plenty of food including some of my favourites.

After a long hesitation, I finally decided to go for a seasonal salad and chestnut flans. And that night was a hit with an array of dishes reflecting the variety of the season.

Sinemage Fall Brioche tart apple grapes and walnuts

At first, I had no particular intention to bake with those seasonal ingredients pictured above. The inspiration came afterwards.

It was a wet, foggy and cold day, the kind when a baking smell emanating from the oven is cheering and you wait patiently sipping a hot cup of tea.

I prefer to enjoy this snack still warm when the fine slices of apples melt in the mouth, the brioche-like base is fluffy and freshly cracked walnuts bring a bit of crunch.
At that time the black NZ grapes were all gone, so I used seedless grapes and it was just fine.

Sinamge Apple walnuts brioche tart

Autumn Tarte Briochée

250g flour
40g caster sugar
50g butter at room temperature, chopped
150 ml lukewarm milk
1 egg yolk
20g fresh yeast or 1 packet of instant dry yeast
One pinch of salt
2 small apples, finely sliced, preferably with a mandolin
Handful of grapes
6 walnuts, freshly cracked open
Brown sugar to sprinkle

For the glaze (optional) I didn’t go for it this time.
1 sheet of gelatin
25ml water
50g caster sugar

Proof fresh or instant dry yeast in the lukewarm milk with a pinch of sugar // In a large bowl mix together flour, sugar, salt // Add butter and with your finger tips make a fine crumble // Incorporate egg yolk and mix // Pour in the milk and the proofed yeast // On a working bench, knead the dough for 10 minutes // Let the dough rest for at least one hour at room temperature in a greased bowl covered with a clean tea towel // Preheat oven to 210°C // Transfer the dough on a slightly dusted surface // With a rolling pin gently roll down the dough and keep a thicker edge all around // Place the dough on a baking tray lined with baking paper // Prick the dough leaving the edge free. Arrange slices of apples and sprinkle brown sugar on top // Bake for 10-15 minutes or until edges are nicely golden // In the meantime, place the sheet of gelatin in a bowl of cold water for 5 minutes // Over a low fire, make a syrup with water and sugar // Wring the sheet of gelatin, add it to syrup and stir // Brush the edge of the tarte briochée with the glaze // Before serving garnish with grapes and walnuts.

Sinemage Fall Brioche tart

La suite en français…

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Saveur d’Enfance

Sinemage Macatia bun

After the school, we would stop at the bakery on the way home. We would buy fresh macatias and would devour them right away.

This bun is a speciality from my home island and can be found along croissant and pain au chocolat in every bakery.

It’s described as a loaf half way between a bread and a brioche -not so rich though. Macatia has a distinctive sour and slightly sweet taste with a thin crust and a soft crumb.

You may think it’s just a bread, but it really is special to me as it was part of my childhood and I’m happy to share it with you.

Sinemage Macatias buns

Baked early in the morning, the macatias were still warm later on for the breakfast with butter melting on the crumb…
Paprika brought a couple of them for the day and I indulged in another one in the afternoon with a warm cup of tea.

I’ve made plain ones, but they are commonly made with chocolate chips too.

Sinemage Macatia on rack

I’m always looking for new way to use the levain, so I was delighted when Thierry shared the recipe on Votre Pain, the site dedicated to bread and created by Florence.
The process may seem a little bit long (2 days) but the result is perfectly authentic – I’ve only reduced the amount of sugar.

Update: Recipe has been translated in English, see the comments section.